Forget Simplicity, Forget Finnegans Wake (too long) and James Joyce (too witty), Join Me and Enjoy Self

Terms of the more difficult star polygons are much more difficult to understand than terms of Sri Yantra and there are a couple of strong reasons for that: (1) polygons become different in geometrical performance and (2) we step in the field where nobody was before us. So, let’s forget about anything simple (my previous post, for example 🙂 and say welcome to the complex world as it was always has been.

I don’t feel myself right if the title Sri Yantra will be the same for more difficult star polygons. Actually, it will be wrong. Sri Sarvabhava Yantra (‘Sri Yantra derived from Beyond’)– this is the term I am going to coin and use to denote the 18-pointed class of star polygons (forming by 11 or 12 interlacing basic triangles). For example,  usually it is the first chakra which follows after Sarvasankshobhana chakra (the inner ring of eight lotus petals).

There are fourteen cards in my private collection of terms for new chakras, and the first description is in the beginning of the list:

1 Sarvabhava chakra — usually the first 18-pointed star polygon made by superimposition of eight isosceles triangles (not 14-pointed like in the case of Sarvasaubhagyadayaka chakra of Sri Yantra.

2 Mahamaya chakra — usually the second chakra (following Sarvabhava chakra) formed by 14-pointed polygon (of course, it isn’t equal to Sarvasaubhagyadayaka chakra, because this is just another level of difficulty than that we had seen in Sri Yantra before).

3 Sarvajnanamaya chakra — believe or not, this is the second rim of 18-pointed polygon, absolutely unique image of ten isosceles triangles.

4 Atmajnana chakra — the second 14-pointed star polygon inside of previous 18-pointed one (still don’t believe?), another rim of ten isosceles triangles.

5 and 6 Sarvanavadyanga chakra ( the 10-pointed polygon of ten triangles) or Vajramaya chakra (the variation of 10-pointed polygon formed by superimposition of 12 or 13 isosceles triangles, asymmetrical up-down, descending or ascending in variants). These two chakras cannot be in one yantra together.

7 and 8 Instead of Sarvanavadyanga chakra (5) and Vajramaya chakra (6) on this level can be seen other two variants: Sarvamoksabhava chakra or Bhuvaneshvari chakra. Sarvamoksabhava chakra (7) consists of 8-pointed polygon, asymmetrical up-down, formed by 9 basic isosceles triangles.

Bhuvaneshvari chakra (8) is 6-pointed polygon and its main feature is that its formed by intersection of twelve (!!!!) basic isosceles triangles. Absolutely unique composition, crazy to perform.

The cards 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 have descriptions of penultimate chakras which can be – as far as I can see it now in 2013 – in five variants.

9 Prajnaparamita chakra (the second inner chakra from double 8-pointed star polygon) is formed by a superimposition of 13 (!!!) isosceles triangles, descending, i.e. asymmetrical up-down.

10 Bhuvaneshvari chakra, or Star of David (or Star of Ishvara) — the independent 6-pointed hexagram put inside irregular hexagon itself.

11 The last variation of Bhuvaneshvari chakra used as the end of Sri Sarvabhava Yantra (14 basic triangles intersection, yes).

12 Shaktitrikona chakra — the primary independent isosceles female triangle hanging down (East) as inner part of Bhuvaneshvari chakra or Sarvasiddhiprada chakra (equilateral triangle).

13 Brahmayoni chakra — the central red rhombus, forming by a superimposition of twelve (!!!) isosceles basic triangles, the end of Sri Sarvabhava Yantra. Extremely rare to see and extremely difficult to perform. And if you think they don’t exist, you are absolutely right. But not in my case.

14 This is the last and ending sign, Sambhogamaya chakra, or a central, very small circus, or a painted red dot, the end of geometrical structure in the entire Sri Sarvabhava Yantra design.

Considering the pioneering feature of investigation the all terms in this post are coined by me, all probably have errors in translation from English into Sanskrit (I cannot see mistakes because I am a happy and blind author of it), but I keep digging it during long, long, long polar nights and days, of course.

Please, don’t bother themselves searching further information online – there is nothing of the kind (wiki, research centers, encyclopedias, books, and magazines have nothing to say on this topic at all and go to hell)  — because what you have got from this humble post is unique, once in life kind of two millennium experience for one. Just accept my sincere congratulation on reading Latinize Sanskrit to the end.

Forget James Joyce and his hundreds pages of texts, forget simplicity, join me and enjoy self.

 

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More Transparent and Half-transparent…

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SRI YANTRA #14,1994

 

6 points of touch in kernel

14+10+10+8=42 colour triangles into a kernel

Diameter of a kernel 10 cm; 3 15/16’’

Diameter of a mandala min 14.1 cm; 5 9/16’’; max  17.9 cm; 7 1/6’’

Diagonal of a defence square 25.4 cm; 10’’

Side of a defence square max 25 cm; 9 13/16’’

 

 The whole collection 1994-95 Sri Yantra and More Difficult Star Polygons consists of 32 items. Some of them are in the private collections, some of them aren’t for sale at all.  Every item is covered by half-transparent protective paper fixed back right side by small drops of glue, it flips easily and/or can be promptly removed.

 The Sri Yantra #14 is a twin sister of #13.  The difference is in blue colour.  The lines of polygons are 0.25 mm, and the main feature of this star is its mathematical exactness as a result of following strict ancient set of rules. The line of red lotus petals are a bit greater then line for green petals (outer ring).  There are four lines in outer circle of mandala and two green strips, inner circle is white.  Bhupura (square of defence) is double svastika, triple black line and full green colour.  So, the technical description is the same like previous one.

 As I have said before electronic image doesn’t have the same impression as original, and now I am watching original drawing, and every time I do it I want to touch paper by fingers just to feel for a second the track of ink  line made 15 years ago.  I don’t know why but I am proud of the fact that nobody in the world can repeat the stars with such thinness of lines in two variations and draw More Difficult Star Polygons the same time.  All stars including the most difficult have the same root in history of human knowledge, the fact makes me amused.

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The cool story of discovery of the ancient mathematical algorithm, its perfection in two variations (easy 6-points of touch and more complex 10-points of touch) of Sri Yantra and nine, NINE /!!!!!!/ variations of more difficult star polygons, Sri Sarvabhava Yantra (part of them) can be upload here in June, 2012.

 

Sometimes transparent and half-transparent are more erotical than just nude, right?

I don’t have any clue what you have thought after reading the title ^~^. I thought about my stars from Sri Yantra collection.

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SRI YANTRA #13, 1994 

6 points of touch in kernel

14+10+10+8=42 colour triangles in kernel

Diameter of kernel 9.9 cm; 3 15/16’’

Diameter of mandala min 14.2 cm; 5 9/16’’; max  18 cm; 7 1/8’’

Diagonal of defence square 25.6 cm; 10 1/16’’

Side of defence square max 25.2 cm; 9 7/8’’

 The whole collection 1994-95 Sri Yantra and More Difficult Star Polygons consists of 32 items. Some of them are in the private collections, some of them aren’t for sale at all.  Every item is covered by half-transparent protective paper fixed back right side by small drops of glue, it flips easily and/or can be promptly removed.

 The lines of polygons in Sri Yantra #13 are 0.25 mm, and the main feature of this star is its mathematical exactness as a result of following strict ancient set of rules. The line of red lotus petals are a bit greater then the line of green petals (outer ring).  There are four lines in outer circle of mandala and two green strips, inner circle is white.  Bhupura (square of defence) is double svastika,  triple black line and full green colour.

 This copy looks very compact, it was a little experimental step: an algorithm allows to jump to a bit smaller diagonal of square, and I thought it is interesting to try it.  That was 1994, I was happy to feel power of stars, and I was a bit younger and interested in experiments.  I like this star, but I have to say, now I like another kind of experiments. (That means obviously a message “I’m still young^_^”).

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The cool story of discovery of the ancient mathematical algorithm, its perfection in two variations (easy 6-points of touch and more complex 10-points of touch) of Sri Yantra and nine, NINE /!!!!!!/ variations of more difficult star polygons, Sri Sarvabhava Yantra (part of them) can be seen here in summer 2012.